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Full text of "The Decorative arts festival for Cooper Union Museum"

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ERRATA 



p. 5 For "The Cooper Union Acquisition Fund" 

read "The Cooper Union Museum Acquisition 
Fund". 

P. 9 For "Javitz" 

read "Senator and Mrs. Jacob K. Javits". 

s^^^ For "Mr. and Mrs. Christian Rohlfing" 
"^^ read "Mr. Christian Rohlfing". 

P. 21 For "Irwin Untermeyer" 
read "Irwin Untermyer". 

P. 24 For "Crewel, the Indian word for the wool in 

which native embroidery is worked, is . . .". 

read "Crewel, the word for the wool in which 

English embroidery was worked, is . . .". 

P. 49 For "Antoine-Andre Raviro" 
read "Anton ie-And re Ravrio". 

P. 57 For "Irwin Untermeyer" 
read "Irwin Untermyer". 

P. 58 Insert "Compliments of Bigelow-Sanford, Inc." 

P. 61 For "Simplicity's was not the metier" 
read "Simplicity was not the metier". 

P. 64 For "Madame Recamier chaise lounge" 
read "Madame Recamier chaise longue". 



33 



THE 
DECORATIVE 

ARTS 
FESTIVAL 

FOR 
COOPER 

UNION 
MUSEUM y 



PRESENTED BY 

THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE 
OF INTERIOR DESIGNERS 

NEW YORK CHAPTER 
FOR THE BENEFIT OF 

THE COOPER UNION 
ACQUISITION FUND 



MONDAY, MAY 22, 1967 I COOPER UNION MUSEUM 



AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF INTERIOR DESIGNERS 

NEW YORK CHAPTER 



OFFICERS 

PAUL H. KRAUSS, PRESIDENT 

ROMAN HEILMAN, CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD 

JAMES G. HENDRIX, FIRST VICE-PRESIDENT 

EVELYN COLEMAN, SECOND VICE-PRESIDENT 

ALBERT HERBERT, SECRETARY 

HAROLD W. RAMBUSCH, TREASURER 

JOHN S. ELMO, ASST. SECRETARY-TREASURER 



BOARD OF GOVERNORS 

ETHYL G. ALPER 
ELISABETH DRAPER 
ALBERTO. HALSE 
DOLORES C. MARSHALL 
EDMUND MOTYKA 
EVELYN G.ORTNER 
THORNDIKE WILLIAMS 
THOMAS A. WOODS 



SUSAN E. MADIGAN, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 



HONORARY CHAIRMAN 



MR. HENRY FRANCIS duPONT 



HONORARY PATRONS AND PATRONESSES 

MRS. LYNDON BAINES JOHNSON 

GOVERNOR AND MRS. NELSON A. ROCKEFELLER 
MAYOR AND MRS. JOHN V. LINDSAY 
SENATOR AND MRS. JACOB K. JAVITZ 
THE HONORABLE JOHN M. BURNS 

MR. AND MRS. WILEY T. BUCHANAN, JR. 

MR. AND MRS. THOMAS S. BUECHNER 

MR. RENE d'HARNONCOURT 

MR. HARRY D. M. GRIER 

MR. AND MRS. AUGUST HECKSCHER 

MR. AND MRS. THOMAS P. F. HOVING 

DR. RICHARD HOWLAND 

DR. AND MRS. GRAYSON L. KIRK 

MRS. ALBERT D. LASKER 

MR. AND MRS. RALPH R. MILLER 

MISS COLLEEN MOORE 

MR. AND MRS. S. DILLON RIPLEY, II 

MR. AND MRS. CHRISTIAN ROHLFING 

MRS. VANDERBILTWEBB 



10 



DONORS 



MISS HOPEABELSON 

ETHYL G. ALPER ASSOCIATES 

BACCARAT, INC. 

BAKER FURNITURE, INC. 

MR. AND MRS. PIERRE BEDARD 

BEEKMAN SHADE CO., INC. 

MR. AND MRS. WALTER BEINECKE, JR. 

THE BELGIAN LINEN ASSOCIATION 

MR. R. V. BENDRAT 

JACQUES BODART, INC. 

LOUIS BOWEN, INC. 

BRENEMAN, INC. 

YALE R. BURGE-ANTIQUES-REPRODUCTIONS 

HENRY CASSEN, INC. 

MRS. OWEN R. CHEATHAM 

CONNECTICUT CHAPTER, A.I.D. 

MISS KATHARINE CORNELL 

DECORATORS CLUB, INC. 

ELIZABETH DRAPER, INC. 

DUNBAR 

MISS MARY E. DUNN 

MRS. HENRY FRANCIS duPONT 

DURKAN CARPET CORP. 

DUX, INC. 

MR. ALBERT I. EDELMAN 



THE FAN COMPANY 

FAR GALLERY 

FINE ARTS FURNITURE, INC. 

FLEUROMA, INC. 

FRENCH & COMPANY, INC. 

MR. ROBSJOHN GIBBINGS 

MR. ALEXANDER GIRARD 

GOTHAM CARPET ASSOCIATES, INC. 

COUNT AND COUNTESS ALVISE GOZZI 

PHILIP GRAF WALLPAPERS, INC. 

MISS MARTHA GRAHAM 

MRS. OSCAR HAMMERSTEIN, II 

HANSEN LAMPS 

COLLEEN MOORE HARGRAVE 

THE HEAD BED CO., INC. 

MRS. FRANCES T. HEARD 

MR. AND MRS. A. A. HOUGHTON, JR. 

HOWARD & SCHAFFER, INC. 

I. D. FABRICS, INC. 

ILLINOIS SHADE DIVISION OF SLICK INDUSTRIAL CO. 

INTERIOR DESIGN MAGAZINE 

INTERNATIONAL LADIES GARMENT WORKERS UNION 

JOANNA WESTERN MILLS COMPANY 

MR. PHILLIP C.JOHNSON 

MISS MELANIE KAHANE 

MELANIE KAHANE ASSOCIATES 

MRS. JACOB M. KAPLAN 



11 



MR. AND MRS. WM. E. KATZENBACH 

MR. AND MRS. PAUL KRAUSS 

MR. AND MRS. L BANCEL LAFARGE 

JACK LENOR LARSEN, INC. 

MRS. EVELYN S. LEHMAN 

MRS. FRANCIS HENRY LENYGON 

MR. AND MRS. PRESTON H. LONG 

MISS DUNCAN MACDONALD 

MR. JEROME MANASHAW 

NANCY McClelland, inc. 

MEREDITH GALLERIES, INC. 

M. MITTMAN &C0., INC. 

MOLLA, INC. 

MISS MARIANNE MOORE 

MRS. DOROTHY LIEBES MORIN 

MOTTAHEDEH 

MISS MARGARET D. NELSON 

NESLE, INC. 

NEW YORK SCHOOL OF INTERIOR DESIGN 

MR. WILLIAM PAHLMANN 

MRS. HENRY PARISH II, INC. 

PATTERSON-PIAZZA, INC. 

MR. EDWARD J. PERRAULT 

MR. AND MRS. HERMANN G. PLACE 

RESOURCES COUNCIL, INC. 

MR. DAVID ROYCE 

MRS. ALINE SAARINEN 



MRS. HOWARD J. SACHS 

MRS. RITA ST. CLAIR 

SCALAMANDRE 

A. SCHNELLER SONS 

I. SCHWARTZ GLASS & MIRROR COMPANY 

ISABEL SCOTT FABRICS CORP. 

SIEGMAN-AMBRO, INC. 

MR. HARVEY SMITH 

MR. JAMES MERRICK SMITH 

SMITH & WATSON 

MR. AND MRS. CRAIG SMYTH 

STAUFFER CHEMICAL CO., NEWBURGH VINYL FABRIC DIV. 

MR. EDWARD DURELL STONE 

THEDLOW, INC. 

MR. VAN DAYTRUEX 

MISS AMY VANDERBILT 

MRS. CORNELIA VAN SICLEN 

VERDE FABRICS & WALLPAPERS, INC. 

VICRTEX SALES CORP. 

VOGUE CARPET CORP. 

MRS. T. REED VREELAND 

MISS DOROTHY WARREN 

JOHN WIDDICOMB COMPANY 

WOOD AND HOGAN, INC. 

MR. EDWARD WORMLEY 

MR. RUSSEL WRIGHT 

MR. JEROME ZERBE 



13 



DONORS -A. I. D. 



JAMES AMSTER ASSOCIATES 

BERYL S. AUSTRIAN 

MRS. ARCHIBALD BROWN 

MICHAEL deSANTIS, INC. INTERIORS 

JAY DORF 

JOHN ELMO ASSOC, INC. 

ANNETTE SIEGEL FREID 

T. MILES GRAY ASSOCIATES, INC. 

JAMES G. HENDRIX 

ALBERT E. HERBERT 

EVELYNNE HOLTZ 

BARBARA JOSELOFF 

SUMNER D. KILMARX 

PAULKRAUSS, INC. 

ELSIE McNeill LEE 

THELEHMANS 

RUTH LIEB 

J. FREDERIC LOHMAN LTD. 

R. K. LYNFORD, INC. 

WILLIAM PAHLMANN ASSOCIATES, INC. 

JOSEPH L ROMAN 

JANETEMPLETON 

DOLLY SCHARF, INC. 

RUTH L STRAUSS, INC. 

MAURICE WEIR ASSOCIATES, INC. 

MR. &MRS. KIRK WHITE 

JOHN B. WISNER 



15 




One of the brilliant talents in the heyday of 18th century design 
was Jean Francois Bony, a partner in the embroidery firm of Bes- 
sardon. IVIonsieur enjoyed the patronage of royalty furnishing water 
color sketches for the hangings at St. Cloud and Malmaison. He was 
influenced by the great Philippe de la Salle, a master of floral designs 
which were used extensively during the Louis XV and Empire periods. 
The floral border embroidered on this length of blue ribbed, white 
striped silk is a design attributed to Bony. Fanciful, delicate, rather 
stylized flowers are embroidered in white and pale colors against the 
deep blue ground on what was probably a salesman's sample for a 
gentleman's coat or waistcoat. The length of silk was purchased by 
the Au Panier Fleuri Fund and is an important addition to the textile 
collection at the Cooper Union Museum. 



Compliments of 

CONNAISSANCE FABRICS INC. 



16 



This superbly carved oak panel (circa 1780) is from the private apart- 
ment of Marie Antoinette at Versailles and attributed to the brothers 
Rousseau, Jean Simeon and Jules Hugues. They were sons of the mas- 
ter carver, Jules Antoine Rousseau, who worked on the interior decorat- 
ing of every important chateau from Versailles, Saint Cloud and 
Fontainbleau to the Chateau Bellevue owned by Madame de Pompa- 
dour. The symmetry of the carving shows a strong neo-classic influence. 
The motif at the top is composed of a plumed helmet from which is 
suspended a trophy of quivers, arrows and torches encircled with floral 
crowns. The bottom motif shows putti bearing laurel leaf branches and 
supporting an octagonal panel with vestiges of three fleur-de-lis. Pur- 
chased by the Council of the Museum from the Leon Decloux Collection. 



Compliments of 

JAMES WARE ASSOCIATES 




17 




Before the middle 17th century, Oriental works of art, indiscriminately called 
"Indian" were on sale in the Paris and London markets. The pair of painted tole 
cache-pots (circa 1750), above, are painted red and decorated with two dif- 
ferent scenes on gilt-framed placques. One scene depicts a master returning 
home on a spirited, but amiable, horse being greeted by a servant. The other 
scene is more conventional, but no less charming, showing a group of buildings 
at the edge of a stream executed in delightfully unreal colors, e.g. the foliage 
on the trees appears in red, blue, green and buff. Many examples of European 
chinoiserie were illustrated by artists who depicted life in the Orient from 
memory, word-of-mouth or very rough sketches. This hardly guaranteed accu- 
rate or authentic reporting, but added greatly to the whimsy of these delightful 
pieces. A gift to the Museum from the Misses Hewitt. 



Compliments of 

SYLVIA BERMAN, ART & ANTIQUES, INC. 




In 1771, Thomas Chippendale made the first Pembroke table (named 
after the Earl of Pembroke), for the great English actor David Garrick 
who needed a portable table that could be easily set up for "taking a 
spot of tea"— the popular new beverage of the day. The Pembroke 
shown here is a later version after Hepplewhite who designed during 
the reign of George III. It was made about 1900. The cabinetmaker 
sought anonymity by incising under the top of the table "made by 
Samuel...". Of mahogany inlaid with satinwood, the oval top has a 
crossband of rosewood veneer. Hinged leaves are supported by wooden 
brackets. Slender, square legs taper to brass casters and are inlaid 
with a fine line of satinwood. A single drawer on the bowed front has a 
matching dummy drawer for balance. A gift to the Museum in the 
bequest of Mrs. John Innes Kane. 



Compliments of 
CHESAPEAKE-SIEGEL-LAND, INC. 



19 



The period of the 1890's was a time of "boldness and experimentation" with 
artists eager for novelty and exorcised from past inspiration by the repeated 
imitations of nature in much of the design of that period. Claude Debussy is 
credited with ushering in the L'Art Nouveau movement playing his composition 
"Quartet in G Minor" and "La Demoiselle Elue" (after the poem, "The Blessed 
Damozel", by Dante Gabriel Rosetti) at the opening of the exhibition, "La Libre 
Esthetique", in Brussels in February, 1894. One of the leaders of the new move- 
ment was Walter Crane, artist and poet. He was so enthusiastic about the design 
of the fabric shown here (incidentally, not an Art Nouveau design but a forerun- 
ner) that he used it in his dining room. The design, by Arthur Wilcock, is a 
machine roller duplex print on heavy cotton (printed on both sides) with a 
design of crocuses and daffodils. A gift to the Museum by Mrs. G. Glen Gould. 

Compliments of 
EAGLESHAM PRINTS, INC. 





20 



tA 



"^■-J"..' 



A fondness for chinoiserie characterized much of the work of early 
rococo designers at the time Johann Gregor Heroldt assumed the 
duties of director and chief painter at the Meissen factory in 1720. 
Under his supervision porcelain achieved a happy union of mate- 
rial, decoration and usefulness. An excellent example is the pear- 
shaped chocolate pot, circa 1725-30, a bequest to Cooper Union 
Museum by Erskine Hewitt. Overglaze painting was one of Her- 
oldt's great contributions to porcelain. He developed improved 
techniques for firing, employing gold and silver decoration. He 
used brilliant colors such as iron red, purples, greens, yellows and 
shades of blue to good advantage to depict Chinese decorations of 
birds, figures and trees. 



Compliments of 
BLOOMINGDALE'S 




21 




This elegant 18th century London tea kettle with stand is doubtless one of the 
reasons tea drinking by the English flourished. In a short time, it became a neces- 
sity to have "elevenses" as well as to stop for the fashionable spot of tea in the 
late afternoon. One of the great designs made by silversmith William Fawdry, 
dated 1711-12, this enchanting bulbous tea kettle has its sides engraved with 
a scrolled coat of arms. The shape is basically Chinese with bands molding the 
curved profile. A molded cover has a wooden knob matching the pivoting, shaped, 
easy-to-handle wood handle. Three sturdy baluster legs on a square plinth have 
a large ring to support the kettle and a smaller ring supporting the small hinged- 
top lamp. The gracefully molded spout has a hinged lid as well as an inner 
spout. The tea kettle was a gift to Cooper Union Museum by Irwin Untermeyer. 



Compliments of 
GEORG JENSEN INC 



22 




Rocking chairs, such as this one designed by Peter Cooper about 1850, were 
said to have therapeutic qualities and were highly recommended for ladies and 
invalids. The spine and neck rest in a natural position and the angle was con- 
sidered highly beneficial to digestion! With such restorative powers it is small 
wonder that rocking chairs have been highly regarded since the first design, 
allegedly by Benjamin Franklin. Early examples were Windsor and the famous 
ladder back Boston rocker. In the mid-19th century bent metal and bentwood 
rockers made an appearance. The steel rocker, above, given to the Cooper Union 
Museum by Norvin Hewitt Green, is a giddy version upholstered in a printed, 
button-tufted red plush. 



Compliments of 
WILLOW & REED INC. 



23 




Of the wealth of artifacts left by the various ancient peoples, none surpasses in interest 
or quantity the pottery fragments and miraculously preserved earthenware vessels. This 
deep bowl of unglazed and painted earthenware is an exceptionally interesting specimen 
dating from the 10th century B.C. It was found in Tepe Syalk, Persia. The bowl is shaped 
to be held comfortably in the hand. The shape also bears a relation to the tools used to 
form it. Natural forms in the area are used as motifs, e.g. the sun and ibex painted in a 
band around the middle. The vignettes, separated by checkered panels (reminiscent of a 
textile design), is a pattern which appears frequently in the archaic pottery of Greece. 
The "animal style" is also typical of the bronzes of Luristan and the gold of Scythia. An 
example of the ancient potter's art in a remarkable state of preservation, this Persian 
antiquity is an important addition to the pottery collection at Cooper Union Museum. The 
bowl was purchased for the Museum in memory of Georgiana C. McClellan. 



Compliments of 

BORIS KROLL FABRICS 



24 




Crewel, the Indian word for the wool in which native embroidery is worked, is as 
much a part of our vocabulary today as it was in the 17th century when the crewel 
work curtain, a fragment of which is shown here, was done. A gift of Mrs. Hunt- 
ington Babcock to the Museum collection, this example of crewel is embroidered 
on a cream twill-weave cotton fabric in a variety of stitches in the traditional all- 
over design of curling leaves. The colors are shades of blue, red, orange, and 
brown. In the 17th century, crewel work was used extensively on bed curtains and 
window draperies, usually in tones of blue and green on a cream ground or in a 
single color on a light background. Interest in crewel work has endured through 
the years. Recently, a revival of interest in this type of embroidery has put crewel 
work, the traditional designs, and the mastering of the embroidery very much in 
the limelight. Needlework experts are creating exciting new designs as well as 
renewing interest in classic motifs. 



Compliments of 

GORDON WINSLOW FABRICS, LTD. 



23 



This silver-gilt candelabra attributed to Claude Ballin, the younger (1661- 
1754), was an anonymous gift to the Museum Collection. During the 18th 
century in France, society became more settled and the art of entertain- 
ing at home became fashionable. With this interest, house-proud nobility 
became aware of the importance of beautiful appointments for their 
homes, particularly those made of precious metals. Gold and silver objets 
d'art became so highly prized that noble families kept inventories of their 
possessions which they compared to the size of the King's private collec- 
tion. This superb Louis XV-style candelabra, one of a pair, consists of 
three parts moulded and chased with rococo motifs in a scroll and floral 
pattern. It has a single terminal branch and shows no maker's mark. 



Compliments of 

THE PEACOCK WALLPAPER COLLECTION 



26 




An unusual collection of white linen tassels dating from the 16tl 
through the 17th centuries are from a bequest made by Richard 
Cranch Greenleaf in memory of his mother, Adeline Emma Green- 
leaf. The construction of the tassels is intricate and beautiful. Some! 
are done with lace stitches as well as hand knotting. The tassel, 
shown at the top, has double-headed eagles forming the skirt of thei 
tassel. Left, tiny human figures are worked into the design. As deli- 
cate as ballet dancers and apparently as durable, these skillfuliy^ 
wrought tassels have lasted more than 200 years. Tassels were usedj 
for trimming and weighting corners of lace table cloths and altar] 
cloths. Smaller sizes were hung from tie cords or adorned lace col- 
lars. Tassels were also used at spaced intervals on decorative braids. 



Compliments of 

J. H. THORP & CO, INC. & 

WH. S. LLOYD CO., INC. 



27 



A classic armchair designed in 1925 by IVIarcel Breuer, a leader in the Bauhaus move- 
ment. This first tubular metal chair expresses the Bauhaus design concept of "right 
forms for right purposes". Originally, the chair had a seat and back of orange-red 
canvas. In 1957 it was replaced with grey canvas. This chair was presented to the 
Cooper Union Museum by Mr. Gary Laredo. The Bauhaus School, founded by Walter 
Gropius at Weimer, Germany, in 1912, developed a cultural cooperation between 
craftsmanship and industry which exists to this day. Phrases familiar to the period 
were to become part of the design vocabulary the world over such as "creation for 
use", "perfect and pure simplicity", and "reason and simplicity". Gropius and his 
followers startled a world emerging from the fussiness of the Victorian and Edwardian 
periods by employing a creative approach to all phases of design and an abstinence of 
external decoration just for the sal<e of embellishment. 



Compliments of 

HOUSE & GARDEN MAGAZINE 




28 




Silver, which played such an important role in the formation of elaborate French 
court styles, in the 17th and 18th centuries, was taken up with enthusiasm in 
Germany in the closing decades of the 17th century. Augsburg and Nuremberg, 
both noted for outstanding metalwork since the 15th century, had a flourishing 
guild of goldsmiths. The superb lobed silver-gilt oval salver on scrolled feet, 
above, has elaborately engraved cartouches representing the four continents- 
Asia is glorified by palm trees, camel and turbaned figure; a horse, helmeted 
figure, tree and building signifies Europe; Africa is illustrated by a lion, a figure 
holding a parasol, a palm tree and pyramid; America, curiously, is designated by 
a palm tree, thatched hut, alligator and a figure with a staff! This unusual and 
handsome salver was made (circa 1752) by Johann Erhard Heuglin, II, of Augs- 
burg. A gift to the Museum by the trustees of the James Hazen Hyde estate. 



Compliments of 

THE INTERIOR DESIGN STUDIO 

AT LORD cSi TAYLOR 



29 




An important, at times dazzling, design concept in the Napoleonic 
age was capturing the great beauties of the Empire in gilt metal 
objets d'art to be used as decoration for furniture, architecture 
and decorative objects. The gilt bronze mount, above, in the form 
of a sphinx, has scrolls of acanthus and olive leaves and is one of 
four to be used in a panel. A gift to Cooper Union IVIuseum from 
IVIrs. Charles B. Alexander. It was doubtless inspired by the ancient 
Italian style which metamorphosed "the virtue of Roman matrons 
and the innocence of Athenian and Corinthian maidens" into the 
unattainable beauty of a Pauline Borghese, Madame Recamier or 
Prud'hon's Josephine. These ladies were usually presented as a 
sphinx-like or classical mythical figure. 



Compliments of 

JEROME MANASHAW A.I.D. 



30 



The Windsor chair originated in England near the town of the same name at the begin- 
ning of the 18th century. It achieved its greatest development and use in America. 
The first Windsor chair appeared in Philadelphia after 1725. By 1760, Windsors were 
in common use in this country and variations on the original design were infinite. 
Curiously enough, Windsor chairs have always been made by wheelrights and wood- 
turners rather than fine cabinet makers. The number of spindles adds to the merit 
of the chair. The first examples imitated fine Queen Anne chairs with rustic attempts 
at round backs, splats, or with splayed or raked, sometimes cabriole, legs. The 
comb-back Windsor chair, below, presented to the Museum by George A. Hearn was 
the type greatly favored by John Adams and Thomas Jefferson. It has the "H" system 
of turned stretchers but an unusual feature is the two drawers — one under the seat 
and one under the leather-covered writing arm — for all the necessaries at hand. 

Compliments of 

HOUSE BEAUTIFUL MAGAZINE 




31 







William Morris, a master of flat design, had such sensitivity for line, 
form, color, and texture that he spurned any hint of Victorian clutter. 
His work was romantic and free in spirit. Founder of Morris, Faulkner 
& Company, the firm specialized in stained glass, carving, metalcraft, 
tiles and tapestries as well as printed and woven fabrics. "Daisy", as 
seen above, the firm's first wallpaper printed from woodblocks was 
executed by Jeffrey & Company. It was presented to the Cooper Union 
Museum by Cowtan & Tout, Inc. In 1934 "Daisy" was reprinted from 
the original 1862 woodblocks with a pattern arrangement of four grow- 
ing plants. Despite the serenity of the pattern, William Morris was 
restless and given to great explosions of untamed temper. On the plus 
side of his turbulent personality, he was influenced by many great 
artists and writers of his time. One of the firm's chief commissions was 
the Green Dining Room in the Victoria and Albert Museum, London. 



' Compliments of 

V Xf.i' ALBERT VAN LUIT & CO. 



32 



An intricately carved 18th century cinnabar lacquer box, one of the Museum's 
rare treasures, was a bequest of Mary Hearn Greims. The carving on red or cin- 
nabar lacquer is in the Ch'ien style depicting a Taoist landscape. A wide border 
of elaborately stylized peonies and other floral forms alternate with eight Bud- 
dhist symbols of happy augury— a pair of fish, canopy, wheel of the law, umbrella, 
mystic knot, conch shell, lotus and vase. Other auspicious devices are carved in 
a wide floral band around the lower portion of the box. Carved lacquer was 
greatly prized by the Chinese; was not made for export. The technique is fasci- 
nating and goes back to the Sung and Yuan Dynasties. On a wood base covered 
with hemp, silk, linen or paper the surface is covered with as many as 250 layers 
of lacquer. The carving is regulated by the thickness of the lacquer. The interiors 
and underbase of these carved lacquer boxes were usually of black lacquer. 



Compliments of 

THE NATIONAL DESIGN CENTER 



ih^^ ^ 



-•-.. vi^J 'M>#, 



#« 







^,.i'' %j; 



"^f 7 --f 



A wedding knife was part of the dowry of every nobleman's daugfi- 
ter in the late Middle Ages. The top edge of the blade was inscribed 
with the bride's name and the date of her marriage. Whether brides 
considered the wedding l<nife standard equipment for self protec- 
tion in that rugged age or as a charming souvenir of a memorable 
day, is not recorded. This handsome example of a 17th century wed- 
ding knife, right, (the custom continuing) was made by Johann 
Theodor de Bry of the Netherlands. Engraved on the top edge of the 
blade is "Johanna Bovwens 1618". The flat side of the handle is 
elaborately engraved with mythological figures on one side and 
scenes from Susannah and the Elders on the other. It was given to 
the Museum by Richard Cranch Greenleaf in memory of his mother. 



Compliments of 

J. P. STEVENS & CO., INC. 



34 



A porcelain, gilt, and polychrome centerpiece, "The Four Conti- 
nents", with figures representing the continents mounted on a 
scrolled and pierced pedestal and capped with a fruit finial is a 
table decoration from the palace at Ludwigsburg, Germany. This 
extraordinary piece, attributed to Johann Goz (1732-1765), is a 
fine example of the massive pieces made in a private porcelain 
factory in Ludwigsburg (tal<en over by Charles Eugene, Duke of 
Wurttemberg) managed by Joseph Jacobs Ringler. In an area 
where there was no fuel and no kaolin to make porcelain, produc- 
tion was costly and quality inferior to that of other German facto- 
ries. However, the porcelain did have good cohesive qualities and 
because of its plasticity objets d'art of this size could be created. 

Compliments of 

CUMBERLAND FURNITURE CORE 




35 




Metal hardware, so widely used in the 18th century, added richness to the furniture as well as 
serving a utilitarian purpose. The lavish use of gilt bronze, dore or ormolu trimmings helped 
protect stress and strain points in the furniture as well as embellish the pieces. France was the 
design leader. Bronze casts easily and is corrosion resistant but oxidizes readily, hence the 
adoption of gilt to protect and enhance metalwork. Cabinetmakers and gilders worked together 
to produce a harmonious effect of looks and practicality. The gilt bronze cartouche, shown 
above, sometimes called an applique or mount, bears the coat of arms of Louis XV of France 
and is from the collection of Leon Decloux. This is a rare museum piece. When furniture styles 
change metal fittings change, e. g. simple rings and handles made campaign furniture porta- 
ble. Drawers always need pulls and doors hinges. The amount of decoration entailed depends 
on the period. The cartouche is a gift of the Museum Council. 



Compliments of 

THE HOUSE & GARDEN GUIDES 



36 



m.\^<^^.^- % ^ «\^«5V%. ^.% 1k%'=^^ 



Tile making, introduced into Medieval Europe by the Moors, sur- 
vived in the hands of peasant artisans until the 15th century when 
there was a resurgence of interest in the art. Tile making reached a 
height of popularity in Holland during the 17th century but it was 
not to spark French imagination for another century despite the fact 
that Italian potters had been making tiles in Lyon since 1512. Pot- 
tery tiles with polychrome overglaze, such as the walnut framed 
panel at right, are typically French in feeling with the swags, flow- 
ers, foliage and corner floral motifs and baguette border with black 
accents. The panel is a gift from Mrs. Montgomery Hare. 

Compliments of 

EDEN VINYL FLOOR TILE 





37 



Domino papers, small paper panels printed from woodblocks, had their begin- 
nings in Normandy, home of the paper mill. Intended as inexpensive substitutes for 
wood paneling and fabric wall coverings, domino papers were used extensively by 
the bourgeoisie as well as by the peasantry. The industry spread to Paris and Lyon 
and to other large French cities. The creative French developed and produced 
great works of art in these papers. Some of the artists credited with domino papers 
are Boucher, Fragonard and Huet. About 1800, the woodblock process gave way to 
roller printing. The dessus-de-porte or overdoor panel, above, is an enchanting still 
life representing a melange of the good things in life found only in home and hearth 
— a rooster, vase of roses, loaf of bread, dish of salt, a jug of wine and a bunch of 
white radishes. The panel was presented to the Museum by the Misses Hewitt. 



Compliments of 

A. H. JACOBS COMPANY, INC., THOMAS SMITH, INC. 



38 



In 1660, Le Brun established the "Manufacture des Gobelins". 
As a result, Louis XIV and his Minister of Works, Colbert, were 
instrumental in transferring leadership of the fabric industry 
from Italy to France, with Lyon as the major weaving center. 
Jean Ravel, a leader in the development of Lyon silks, invented 
the mise en carte method of indicating a woven pattern on 
paper with lines and squares to indicate the weft and warp. He 
also invented point rentre, a method of denoting naturalistic 
shadings by interpenetration of two different adjacent colors. 
Shown is a section of 18th century polychrome silk in panier 
fleuri pattern— a large scale floral motif. 

Compliments of 

BOUSSAC OF FRANCE INC. 




39 



Designers in the 18th century were wont to speak of "Chinese taste" In 
referring to the Oriental look and flavor which was so prevalent in many of 
the designs of that day. This feeling for the oriental could be traced back to 
the 17th century when many Chinese and Japanese manufactures of porce- 
lain, furniture and fabrics were brought to Europe. Their influence gradually 
affected more than a century of design. This mahogany chair is a splendid 
example of "Chinese taste". It has the subtle design characteristics of the 
Orient such as the rectangular back filled with a fretwork of rounded, slightly 
curved members; arms gently curved; rear legs rounded while the front legs 
resemble reeds bound together. This piece appears in Thomas Chippen- 
dale's trade catalogue— "The Gentleman and Cabinet Maker's Directory". 

Compliments of 

WHITNEY PUBLICATIONS, INC. 




40 




The gayly decorated wig or cap stand, above, was made in tlie 
18th century in China for the European export trade. The 
shape is so reminiscent of the oil lamps made a century later, 
it might have been the model. Of white porcelain with under- 
glaze blue decoration, it is ornamented in the best tradition 
of the symbolic Chinese, e. g. the lotus, a sign of fruitfulness 
and purity. Other auspicious emblems and flowers denoting 
longevity and happiness also appear on the stand. A bequest 
to the Museum by Richard Cranch Greenleaf. 



Compliments of 
TRESSARD FABRICS INC. 



41 




Trade with the East Indies brought colorful hand-painted Indian 
fabrics to England and were the inspiration for founding the 
English calico industry by William Sherwin in 1676. Due to the 
challenge from the imported prints, the silk and wool industries 
obtained a ban on the importation of Indian chintzes. It wasn't 
until 1774 that the ban was lifted. To distinguish domestic from 
imported chintzes, a blue thread was woven into the selvage of 
the former. This length of cotton tabby weave cloth shows a 
large scale pattern of flowering trees with parrots and smaller 
birds in shades of brown, tan, rose, red, blue and faded violet 
in a bold and rather heavy manner. It was printed circa 1780. 
Purchased in memory of Mrs. John Innes Kane. 



Compliments of 

ARTHUR H. LEE & SONS, INC. 

AND JOFA, INC. 



42 




The palatial architecture of the 18th century called for equally important orna- 
mental grillework for gates, balconies and other decorative architectural details 
in buildings and public squares. Representative of the elaborateness of the detail 
employed is shown in the lantern. Probably French in origin, it was a gift to 
Cooper Union Museum by Isabella Barclay. Rococo scrolls and floriations com- 
posed in a free-flowing arrangement within the right angle of the top piece is 
further enhanced by sprays of flowers and bunches of grapes. The lantern is 
designed with a pentagonal base with five curving members to meet the lower 
corners of the sheet metal hood. The lantern is also embellished with the same 
scrollwork and foliage. It is black with a white painted interior. 



Compliments of 

DIRECTIONAL FURNITURE SHOWROOMS INC. 



43 



The earliest known date for English porcelain is 1754 on a Chelsea milk jug. 
English porcelain factories imitated French soft paste porcelain not the German 
hard paste. The first English designs began as imitations of blanc-de-Chine — 
white-with-white relief. English porcelains are so much alike it is hard for experts 
to distinguish differences. Chelsea, for example, is distinctive for its claret color. 
But as several factories used the same mark even a distinctive color isn't posi- 
tive proof. The anchor mark appears not only on Chelsea and Bov*/ but on Coal- 
port tool Chelsea has one distinguishing feature — the spur marks on the 
underside left by the clay cones or cockspurs used as supports during firing. The 
two Chelsea plates, above, with a design after George Dionysius Ehret, have the 
typical Chelsea overglaze decoration. Each plate carries the red anchor mark. 

Compliments of 
EDWARD FIELDS INC. 




44 



Toile, that melodious word for finely woven cotton, and a toile de 
Jouy is the same fabric printed with classical scenes, usually in one 
color on a creamy ground. Longtime darling of professional and home 
decorators, toile owes its creation to a Bavarian, Christophe-Philippe 
Oberl^ampf, who established a cotton print factory at Jouy in 1760 to 
find a cheaper substitute for costly printed silks. Being an outstand- 
ing artist as well as a business man, he created a demand for his 
designs depicting bourgeois scenes, fables and historical events. One 
of his gifted artists, Jean Baptiste Huet (1745-1811) designed the 
textile panel shown here. "Offronde a I'Amour" is one of the fine 
printed cottons in the Cooper Union Museum collection. 

Compliments of 

GREEFF FABRICS, INC. 




45 




The origin of tine small but substantial roundabout or "burgomaster" chair 
is uncertain. A gift to Cooper Union Museum by Alfred G. Burnham, this 
chair is early 18th century. The roundabout was probably introduced into 
England from Holland and possibly made in the Dutch East Indies for 
export to the western world. The Oriental origin is clearly discernable in 
the symmetrical plant design in the back splats and scrollwork. The cabri- 
ole legs, developed in the later 18th century, antedate the paw feet usually 
found after 1720. Made of elaborately carved ironwood, the chair com- 
bines the charm of Eastern influence, the solidity any burgomaster would 
require in a chair i.e. handsome detailing plus the solidity worthy of hold- 
ing an official, and the convenience of a swivel to afford a full view of a 
meeting. The carved head finials are typical of burgomaster chairs. 



Compliments of 

KNOLL ASSOCIATES, INC. 



46 



The delectable wallpaper covered bandboxes popular at the turn of the century 
represented some of the first, and possibly the finest, color printing with wood- 
blocks done in America at the time. The early papers reflected a French influ- 
ence but soon a definite American design and color feeling was shown in the 
clear colors achieved by gouache opaque colors and in the designs of historical 
vignettes, birds and flowers, and prints of rural scenes and buildings. The 
beguiling cardboard bandbox, below, a gift to the Museum Collection by the 
Misses Hewitt, was made in 1830. These handy boxes were not only decorative 
but useful for storing bonnets, ribbons, hairpieces and jewelry. Borders on 
wallpapers such as this one of lush roses, festoons, swags and garlands served 
a useful function as wall decorations, too, as they did not interfere with the 
pictures or other wall decorations hung below. 

Compliments of 
OLD STONE MILL 




47 





Favrile, a word used by Louis Comfort Tiffany (1848-1933) to designate 
the glass produced in his factory, was derived, according to Tiffany, from 
an old English word, "fabrile", which pertained to a craftsman and his 
craft. The iris-shaped vase, shown here, a favorite design of his, was 
acquired by the Museum in memory of Georgiana L. McClellan. It is typi- 
cal of Tiffany blown glass productions which so often took forms from 
nature in Art Nouveau style. This one, circa 1910, is characterized by a 
floral inspiration. The flaring tulip shaped top is opal and amber glass 
with green speckles and stripes on the base and stem to form veins. The 
Tiffany designs in glass, more highly prized now than when they were 
made, have a fluid, liquid, even lyric quality found in no other glass. 



Compliments of 

AMERICviN VISCOSE DIV, FMC CORP 



48 




»*• -^■. -mami 




The technical proficiency and imagination shown in the arts and handicrafts of 
the Scandinavian countries in the past thirty years has been consistently good — 
the outgrowth of native talents. Finland, the smallest of the group, has produced 
a number of outstanding artists with terrific energy, direction and output so 
distinguished that the work has attracted universal admiration. Typical of Fin- 
land's hand-loom weaving is the hanging, "Profiles", by Eva Antilla, one of Fin- 
land's most creative weavers. She is a specialist in tapestry weaving rendering her 
designs first in watercolors or crayon before translating them to the loom. The 
tapestry, above, woven in 1952, is made with wool, synthetic fibers and novelty 
yarns. A gift to Cooper Union Museum by Elizabeth Gordon. 



Compliments of 
STROHEIM & ROMANN 



I 



49 




Clocks of infinite variety and detail, representing scenes of the times 
such as the one shown here, were identified with the neo-classic Empire 
style more than with other objets of the time. This superb example (circa 
1800) is more than a clock, rather a social document depicting a day in 
the life of Hortense, Queen of Holland. Signed by Antoine-Andre Raviro, 
bronze maker, it is made of fire-gilt bronze rich with neo-classic details, 
e.g. the Queen seated at her harpsichord in a miniature Empire setting 
flanked by two griffons and with a bust of Apollo supported by two cher- 
ubs in the center. The Empire costume, furnishings, and decorative de- 
tails are perfect to the last exquisite detail in the little vignette. The clock 
is a document of a time and period venerated by a master craftsman. 



Compliments of 
CHARLES BLOOM, INC. 



50 



China Trade imports entered Europe at the beginning of the Age of Discovery, in the 
15th century, and gradually increased until the opening of the Suez Canal in 1896. 
America became a leading participant in trade with the Orient shortly after the Amer- 
ican Revolution. The first American ship to have direct communication with the Far 
East was the "Empress of China" in 1784. Clipper ships sailed into eastern American 
ports with holds full of treasures. Cargoes included marvelous bamboo furniture which 
had instant popularity (even to this day). Chairs, like the one below (circa 1815), 
came as venture cargo or as souvenirs for the ladies who languished at home awaiting 
their sailors' return. The technique of manufacturing bamboo furniture was dictated 
by the nature of the material i.e. it is easily bent when treated with hot water and 
there is no end to the imaginative designs the clever Chinese wrought for export. Their 
methods vary greatly from those used by European imitators of Chinese furniture. 



Compliments of 

CELANESE FIBERS MARKETING CO. 




51 




Brussels lace rabat or cravat end made of linen-bobbin lace in the mid-18th century was a gift 
io the Cooper Union Museum from the estate of and in memory of Mrs. Robert B. Noyes. A 
remarkable example of the lace maker's art, the design — a hunter on horseback surrounded by 
'oliage, woodland creatures, birds and human figures — is a marvel of the minutiae of detail 
Belgian lace makers displayed. Bobbin lace is made on a pillow carrying the pattern which 
guides the worker. Instead of using a needle numerous bobbins are employed to twist or plait 
the threads without the limitations imposed by the loom or needle. The peak of lace making 
was in the 17th century. Today there are a few convents and schools to keep the art alive. 



Compliments of 

DURALEE FABRICS LTD. 



52 



A rebellion against the heavy formality of 18th century romanticisms 
resulted in another type of romanticism among English designers 
and architects. The incongruity of applying tombstone designs from 
a cathedral to a bedroom or employing the architectural details 
from a great hall as the design motif for a birdcage, right, was part 
of the design revolt. The Gothic and Gothic Revival periods are 
uniquely English. Unlike the design concepts of an earlier period 
when English artists were fascinated with all things oriental and 
borrowed designs from the Chinese, they can take credit for Gothic 
designs without a bow to anyone outside the country. During the 
1740's actual "sham" Gothic ruins were built for their romantic 
quality! Probably the most notable and most publicized example of 
this type of architectural design was Horace Walpole's country 
house, "Strawberry Hill", built in 1747. 




Compliments of 

ELLEN L. McCLUSKEY ASSOCIATES, INC. 



I 



55 



TEN SETTINGS SHOWING TREASURES FROM THE COOPER UNION 
MUSEUM COLLECTIONS IN ROOMS DESIGNED FOR TODAY'S LIVING 




The dark ornateness of Jacobean furniture is very mucli at liome in 
a contemporary architectural setting. Rough plastered white walls 
and the dark woods might well be in a manor house of the period. 
The warmth and richness of the Jacobean period is achieved by 
using a rich red rug. The authentic Jacobean chairs are as new as 
tomorrow in an adaptation of the classic flame stitched in brilliant 
shades of red, blue and mustard gold. Contemporary decorating 
touches are the "low hung" ancestor portraits and the delicacy of a 
flowering branch arranged in the subtility of the Japanese manner. 
The charming small 17th century wood and metal chest inlaid with 



ivory is deceptively Oriental in feeling. It is Italian in origin at a time 
when the more decorative Italian cabinetry adopted elaborate orna- 
mentation including marquetry of colored woods as well as ivory. 
Floor-to-ceiling bookshelves showing fine bindings mixed with color- 
ful modern book jackets are an integral part of the decorating 
scheme in this planned, but not contrived eclectic room. The walnut 
chairs (circa 1691), inspiration for the room, are from the Cooper 
Union Museum Collection, the gift of Irwin Untermeyer. The 17th 
century chest, also from the Museum Collection, was an anonymous 
gift. Designer: Edmund Motyka, A.I.D. 



Compliments of 
CURTIS-DOBKIN INC. 



58 



Vibrant colors, extravagantly used, can be the quintessence of 
decorating. In an alcove for dining, below, a strong yellow-gold 
and red color scheme has a "look" so typical of the Regency 
period it might be in the Royal Pavilion in Brighton with its 
wondrous Chinese decorations. The best examples of this brilliant 
and amusing period are on view in the Prince Regent's Palace. 
The room with its draped tent effect is an adaptation from an 
original watercolor by Fredericl< Grace and the property of the 
Museum. Mr. Grace and his firm executed many drawings and 
sketches for the Brighton Pavilion. The bamboo patterned wall- 
paper, in yellow and red, made specially for this setting, was 



reproduced from a Museum document. A textured red and yel- 
low random-pattern carpet, a red lacquered sofa upholstered in 
yellow velvet and mustardy gold taffeta, draperies trimmed in 
red, underscore the two-color theme. A mixed bag of accessories 
—genuine antiques and modern reproductions— give the setting 
pazzazz. Miniature Ghinese low chests, set for dining in front 
of the long sofa, are dressed with vermeil, silver and china to 
carry out the Oriental theme— typical of the Regency period. In 
the foreground, an authentic bamboo chair, of the type used 
in the Brighton Pavilion, is also from the Museum Gollection; a 
gift of Mrs. William Pedlar. Designer: John B. Wisner, A.I.D. 






Sparse as a monk's cell, the room above is an exercise in planes In 
relation to space. Complete flexibility in a room Is only possible with 
the elimination of non-essentials graphically Illustrated here in the 
selection of furniture and accessories. Using eye-deceiving illusion 
gives a beyond-the-horlzon quality, e. g. the brilliant ultramarine 
blue plush-covered wall, the mirrored panel reflecting and length- 
ening the low built-in cabinet shelf, see-through furniture, the gleam 
of steel and the textured rug on a white floor. Two furniture classics, 
a steel and canvas Breuer chair and a Corbusier-designed angular 
and curved chaise, are placed to catch light filtered through the 



translucent window. The placement of the free standing tree lamp 
Is unorthodox but makes sense lighting the seating areas as well as 
Illuminating the wool wall hanging. This Is a room to be admired 
for Its uncompromising immaculateness, yet llvabillty. The choice 
of a brilliant wall color and primary colors In the abstract wall hang- 
ing lights and warms clinical steel and glass. The following are from 
the Museum collection, the Inspiration for the spacial concept of 
the room: armchair by Marcel Breuer, Finnish glass bowl by Hongell, 
wool wall hanging by Fillla, and the tribal mask from the French 
Sudan. Designer: Albert Herbert, A. I. D. 



Compliments of 

STARK CARPET CORP 




:iu- 



J 






Upholstering walls, furniture and the frame of ceiling-high 
shelves, with the same patterned fabric is one way to generate 
excitement in a small room furnished with reproductions and 
antique accessories — mostly 18th century. Flamestitch, restyled 
in a large scale for this room. In two shades of blue with white, 
is the design interest in this room. Used lavishly on walls and 
furniture, an importantly-scaled fabric such as this one, gives a 
room with less than majestic proportions, extra dimension and 
perspective. The Queen Anne reproduction desk is lacquered in 
one of the blues in the fabric, then distressed. An eye-fooling 
decorating trick is the sharp punctuation of white over-draperies, 



ceiling-to-floor, with the pattern fabric for under curtains to cover 
the windows. A clever way to mask a bad view or make a win- 
dow where none exists. The conglomeration of goodies on the 
shelves: painted tinware, ceramics, Staffordshire, pewter, porce- 
lain, etc., range in period from mid-18th to mid-19th century, 
obviously, the selection of a collector of "things" with well- 
trained tastes. All objects are from the Museum Collection repre- 
senting gifts from: the Misses Hewitt, Mrs. John Innes Kane, Mrs. 
Paul Moore, Miss Eleanor Gamier Hewitt, Mary Hearn Greims, 
Miss Ethel Cram, Mrs. Frederick Thompson and Alexander W. 
Drake. Designer: David Eugene Bell, A.I.D. of Bloomingdale's. 



Compliments of 
BRUNSCHWIG & FILS, INC. 



61 



Straight out of "Dinner At Eigtit", lacking only the platinum 
blondness of the late Miss Harlow, the boudoir off-bedroom 
below is as fabulous as a 30's extravaganza. A tribute to Hobe 
Erwin, creator of many of the movie sets in that period, the 
room has true elegance and a refinement which, today, alas, 
would be greeted with shouts of laughter as a prime example 
of high camp! The boudoir is an interpretation of a period 
when extravagance in cloud cuckoo-land was not only in 
order but a wonderful soporific from the grim reality of a 
depression. The neo-classic design of the chaise, upholstered 



in a fabric inspired by a chinoiserie porcelain, sets the design 
theme for the room. The recurring bird motif appears in the 
fabric, in a life-size statue and on the carved legs of the glass- 
shelved curio cabinet. In the manner of the time, furs, feath- 
ers, mirrors and masses of bibelot abound. Simplicity's was 
not the metier of the time — note the shutters, designed with 
the 30's feeling. The bibelot massed on the shelves and tables 
range from Wedgewood figurines and Lalique glass to a basalt 
chocolate service. All are from the Cooper Union Museum 
collection. Designer: Joseph Braswell, A.I.D. 



Compliments of 

E. I. du PONT de NEMOURS & CO. 



INC. 




62 



A style of nineteenth century furniture generically named for Queen Victoria's long reign, was often 
clumsy and over-ornate. Some pieces developed from English and American Empire designs had 
a quaint charm. In this country, the best examples are the worl< of John Belter. Soft curves combined 
with straight lines, exotic carvings and turnings, inlays of brass, wood and mother-of-pearl charac- 
terized his designs. Black walnut and rosewood were predominate with an occasional lacquered or 
papier mache accent piece. The later Victorian period benefited by the machine process which 
enabled designers, such as Eastlake and William Morris, to develop a concept of furniture which is 
good today. Despite the lack of clutter in this room and the clarity of colors, it is Victorian in feeling 
with a freshness not associated with Victorian. The Belter sofa and side chairs from the Museum 
Collection. Designer: Jerome Manashaw, A.I.D. 

Compliments of 

S. M. HEXTER COMPANY 





The designs of the Adam brothers, based on Pompeiian and French 
styles, were characterized by delicacy, restraint and classic simpli- 
city. Robert, James and William Adam, renowned architects, 
designed furniture to fit the requirements of the superb houses they 
built. Their designs flourished in the late Georgian period of 18th 
century England. The Adam drawing room, above, is elegantly furn- 
ished with the lightly scaled pieces of mahogany and satinwood the 
Adams' favored. Some of the distinguishing features are straight 
lines, tapering legs, low-relief carving on flat surfaces decorated 



with painting and gilding, inlays and carved molding. Adam furni- 
ture has inherent charm and beauty, but lacks the warmth of other 
designs. However, the light scale make it suitable for today's rooms, 
and mixes well with other styles. All the ornaments used in the 
Adam drawing room are authentic. The following are from the 
Museum Collection: fire screen (circa 1900); urn stand (circa 
1790); bulb vase (circa 1815); Pembroke table (circa 1900); 
bequests of Mrs. John Innes Kane. The silver candlesticks a gift of 
Irwin Untermeyer. Designer: Jeannette Lenygon, A. I. D. 



Compliments of 

WINDOW SHADE MANUFACTURERS ASSN. 



64 



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As martial as a drumbeat, the room above, in Napoleonic blue and 
red, is furnished with Empire furniture and objects of the period 
from the Museum. The handsome ceiling-to-floor screen, made for 
the setting, is based on one in the Council Chamber at Malmaison 
and is the focal point of the room. Brilliant red and blue striped 
nylon is tautly stretched in the painted blue panels decorated with 
brass domed plaques. A brilliant red carpet and roundabout modern 
chairs, upholstered in dazzling blue felt, do much to give the room 
a definite contemporary feeling of now as well as maintaining the 
status quo of the Empire period. Under Napoleon's direction Direc- 
toire became Imperial. At his bidding, Greek and Roman pieces were 
adapted or copied. The furniture was frequently ornamented with 



bronze and gilded appliques. The Empire period supported both 
massive architectural pieces and small, graceful furniture such as 
the Madame Recamier chaise lounge. The influence of this period 
may be found in later Beidermier, American Federal and English 
Victorian designs. Furniture and objects from the Museum: 
Mahogany chest with bronze mounts, circa 1810, a bequest of Mrs. 
John Innes Kane; a mahogany and maple birdcage, circa 1850, 
a gift of the Misses Hewitt; mahogany wash stand, circa 1815, an 
anonymous gift; the Queen Hortense clock (seen in close-up on 
page 49) from the estate of Carl Loeb; and the tole vase, circa 
1820, given to the Museum by Mr. and Mrs. Talbot John Taylor. 
Designer: William Pahlmann, A.I.D. 



Compliments of 

E. I. du PONT de NEMOURS & CO., INC. 



65 



Not satisfied with transforming gardens and terraces into bosky dells, an exciting new dimension can be 
added to a house to bring the outdoors permanently indoors, by the sleight of hand of real and simulated 
nature. Today's beautifully finished outdoor-indoor furniture designs work well under blue skies or artifcial 
light. With the help of a color scheme that challenges nature at every step, the open-door decorating, above, 
is a delight to the eye. In a blue-green plus white morning room, inspired by the Mediterranean at its most 
brilliant, meals from breakfast through lunch, tea, cocktails and supper may be enjoyed under conditions 
rivaling the Cote d'Azur. Keyed by a rug in shades of blues and greens and in an appropriately wavy design. 
A kicky wall of art nouveau iron lattice with a fan-shaped grille, surely must have come straight from a 
1920's villa at Cap Ferrat, diffuses "sunlight" without blocking the view of the massed tropical plants or 
perchance, the sea beyond. A glass-topped table permits a clear view of the "sea" underfoot as well as the 
luxuriant pseudo-ivy "growing" under the top. Priceless accessories in earthenware, terra cotta and faience 
from Iran, Persia and Germany respectively, date from the 13th to 18th centuries. From the Museum Col- 
lection. Designer: Ethyl Alper, A.I.D. 



Compliments of 

C. H. MASLAND & SONS 



WWrnm^MMj^ 













The elegance of an authentic 18th century house with its mellowed 
brick exterior and vast expanses of manicured landscape, calls for an 
equally elegant ladylike interior. A faultless example of a French 
Regence drawing room, above, is framed by magnificent boiserie 
panels (circa 1750) on three walls of the importantly-sized drawing 
room. The fireplace wall is covered with an equally handsome hand- 
painted chinoiserie panel, a recent import from France. The room is 
as pure in concept as a royal retreat of the period. Fruitwood pieces 
from the Louis XV and Louis XVI periods are posed against a back- 
gcoundofapale, but definite color— ciel blue— to enhance the warm 
woba-tdrle^'ang ,gfn phasize the color of the painted fauteuils. Ciel-blue 



moire draperies, with swagged valances and tassel-trimmed braid, 
match the background color of the painted wallpaper panel which 
boasts flowering branches, birds and butterflies done in delicate 
natural colors. The gleam of glass, brass and burnished gold leaf pick 
up and reflect bits and pieces of the room in varying degrees of magic 
depending on the time of the day. Skillful color accents are the 
orange-y coral cache-pots, real flowering quince branches and golden- 
orange roses mixed with blue-purple iris. The brasses on the Louis 
XV commode are worthy of special attention; they are of museum 
quality. Boiserie panels were purchased for the Cooper Union Muse- 
um by the Council for the Museum. Designer: Mary E. Dunn, A.I.D. 



Compliments of 
U.S. PLYWOOD - 



-CHAMPION PAPERS, INC. 



FESTIVAL COMMITTEES 
GENERAL CHAIRMAN 

JEROME MANASHAW, A.I.D. 

ARRANGEMENTS 

ETHYL G. ALPER, A.I.D. 
JAMES AMSTER, F.A.I. D. 
DAVID EUGENE BELL, A.I.D. 
JOSEPH BRASWELL, A.I.D. 
MARY E. DUNN, F.A.I. D. 
ALBERT HERBERT, A.I.D. 
PAULH. KRAUSS, A.I.D. 
JEANNETTE LENYGON, F.A.I. D. 
ELLEN L McCLUSKY, F. A.I.D. 
JAMES CHILDS MORSE, A.I.D. 
MARGARET D. NELSON, A.I.D. 
WILLIAM PAHLMANN, F. A.I.D. 
L. RAYMOND TOUCHER, F.A.I. D. 
JANET LUCE REYNOLDS, A.I.D. 
CORNELIA VAN SICLEN, A.I.D. 
JOHN B. WISNER, F. A.I.D. 

PROMOTION 

MELVACHESROWN 
RICHARD DILLON, JR. 
JAMES CHILDS MORSE, A.I.D. 

DECOR FOR "IN LILAC TIME" 

STANFORD SQUIRE, A.I.D. 

OUR SPECIAL THANKS TO 

MR. AND MRS. LESTER S. ABELSON 

THE PADDINGTON CORP., J. & B. RARE SCOTCH 

FLOWERS: LINSLEY LTD. 

MUSIC: BILL HARRINGTON ORCHESTRA 

FABRIC: EVERFAST FABRICS INC. 



71 



MUSEUM CATALOGUE 



COVER DESIGN 

JEREMIAH GOODMAN, A.I.D. 

EDITOR 

EDMUND MOTYKA, A.I.D. 

ART DIRECTOR 

WOLFGANG FYLER 

WRITER 

MARYC. BURKE 

EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS 

CAROLYN BARTEL, EDMUND MOTYKA INC. 
LEE CANNON, INTERIOR DESIGN MAGAZINE 
THOMAS LENNOX, COOPER UNION MUSEUM 
CATHERINE LYNN, COOPER UNION MUSEUM 
JANET THORPE, COOPER UNION MUSEUM 

ADVERTISING COMMITTEE 

EVELYNNE HOLTZ, CHAIRMAN, A.I.D. 
EVELYN COLEMAN, A.I.D. 
HENRY M. FULLER, A.I.D. 
STEPHEN GASPERECZ, A.I.D. 
DOLLY SHARE, A.I.D. 
RUTH L. STRAUSS, A.I.D. 
CORNELIA VAN SICLEN, A.I.D. 

ROOM PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF 

E. I. duPONT de NEMOURS & CO., INC. 
THE McCALL CORPORATION 



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